• European Union students studying in England and enrolling in 2020-21 will continue to be eligible for ‘home fee status’, which means they will be charged the same tuition fees as UK students. They will also be able to access student loans as before. More information is available from the website of the UK government.

  • European Union students studying on an undergraduate course in Scotland and enrolling in 2020-21 will be guaranteed free tuition for the duration of their courses. More information is available on the Universities Scotland website and from the Scottish Government.
  • European Union students studying in Wales and Northern Ireland and enrolling in 2020-21 will continue to be eligible for ‘home fee status’, which means they will be charged the same tuition fees as UK students. They will also be able to access student loans as before. More information is available from the Welsh Government and the Student Loans Company.
  • EU students studying in the UK under the Erasmus programme: Their immigration status has not changed, and they continue to be eligible for their Erasmus grant until as long as we remain a member of the EU and could well be extended beyond this. UUK is liaising with the British Council as National Agency for Erasmus+ and institutions are advised to check the Erasmus+ websites regularly for updates including student-focused communications.
  • The UK Government has stated publicly that the United Kingdom is committed to continuing full participation in the Erasmus+ programme up until the UK leaves the European Union. The UK will continue to benefit from all EU programmes, including Erasmus+, until the end of the current budget plan (2014-2020).
  • The UK government has also announced that it would extend the guarantee to cover all successful collaborative bids to the EU Horizon 2020 funding programme involving UK entities (including institutional partners) in a "no deal" scenario up until the end of the programme. This is a post-exit extension of the ‘underwrite guarantee’ from August 2016 and will cover the lifetime of all Horizon 2020 projects, even where they last beyond 2020. The government expects that the underwrite guarantee will not be needed – it is for the “unlikely event that the Withdrawal Agreement is not ratified”.

The UK has some of the best universities and researchers in the world, and international students, academics and researchers play a significant part in that success. If you've applied to study in the UK and are concerned about what the referendum results mean for you, here are some things you can do to find out more information:

Universities UK (UUK), which is the representative organisation for the UK's universities, has more information on the impact of the UK government's Immigration White Paper (19 December 2018) on international students: What does the immigration white paper mean for international students?

Click here to read the FAQ section from Universities UK. Further information is also available on the Study UK website.

Email us with specific questions or queries

We are here for you if you have a question or query about UK study. Please email us at studyuk.germany@britishcouncil.org   

 

Frequently Asked Questions:

After the referendum result – should/can I still apply to study in the UK?

The referendum result has no immediate implications for international students wanting to study in the UK, including those already studying in the UK. There are no immediate changes to their immigration status, fee status and access to tuition fee loans. The UK has always been and continues to welcome high quality international students.

What has the UK Government said?

There will be no immediate changes following the EU Referendum, including in the circumstances of British citizens living in the EU, and European citizens living here. This includes those studying or working at UK universities. For students, visitors, businesses and entrepreneurs who are already in the UK or who wish to come here, there will be no immediate change to our visa policies.

 

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/statement-on-higher-education-and-research-following-the-eu-referendum

 

However, we can currently offer no assurances that the status of international students will not change once the UK leaves the EU.

What about the announcement from the UK Home Secretary about new restrictions on overseas students?

The announcement mentioned new restrictions on overseas students, including two-tier visa rules affecting some universities and courses. However, before these are in place, a consultation will be take place, including with UK Universities as well as their umbrella bodies.

What about student loans and access to them?

The UK’s Students Loan Company (SLC) issued a statement to reassure EU nationals currently attending English universities who are in receipt of student loans from the SLC, or who intend to begin studying from autumn 2019, will continue to receive these loans and grants until they finish their course.

 

However, we can currently offer no assurances that access to loans may not change once the UK leaves the EU. We will continue to update this page as information is announced.

Why should I still apply for study in the UK?

The UK has some of the best universities and researchers in the world, and international students, academics and researchers play a significant part in that success. If you've applied to study in the UK and are concerned about what the referendum results mean for you, here are some things you can do to find out more information:

Universities UK has also stated that immigration status of EU students studying in the UK under the Erasmus programme has not changed, and they continue to be eligible for their Erasmus grant until at least as long as the UK remains a member of the EU and could be extended beyond this. Moreover EU students with a place to start in academic year 2016/17 and 2017/18  have no reason to assume any change to your  immigration status or access to student loan book.

What’s your opinion on the referendum result?

We respect the decision of the UK electorate, are working towards a positive outcome to the negotiations that follow the result. We recognise this process is a two-sided negotiation and are seeking a “win-win” result that recognises what both sides have to lose and/or gain.

How many students are currently studying in the UK?

There are currently over 500,000 international students from over 80 countries studying in the UK. We recognise that these students make a significant contribution to the diversity and intellectual vitality of UK education, making a critical contribution to UK research capacity and standing in the globalised knowledge economy.

 

Last updated: 4 November 2019